[html5] r3884 - [e] (0) Expand the history section, drop the relationships sections.

whatwg at whatwg.org whatwg at whatwg.org
Thu Sep 17 17:13:30 PDT 2009


Author: ianh
Date: 2009-09-17 17:13:29 -0700 (Thu, 17 Sep 2009)
New Revision: 3884

Modified:
   index
   source
Log:
[e] (0) Expand the history section, drop the relationships sections.

Modified: index
===================================================================
--- index	2009-09-17 22:56:55 UTC (rev 3883)
+++ index	2009-09-18 00:13:29 UTC (rev 3884)
@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@
   <div class=head>
    <p><a class=logo href=http://www.whatwg.org/ rel=home><img alt=WHATWG src=/images/logo></a></p>
    <h1>HTML5</h1>
-   <h2 class="no-num no-toc" id=draft-standard-&mdash;-17-september-2009>Draft Standard &mdash; 17 September 2009</h2>
+   <h2 class="no-num no-toc" id=draft-standard-&mdash;-18-september-2009>Draft Standard &mdash; 18 September 2009</h2>
    <p>You can take part in this work. <a href=http://www.whatwg.org/mailing-list>Join the working group's discussion list.</a></p>
    <p><strong>Web designers!</strong> We have a <a href=http://blog.whatwg.org/faq/>FAQ</a>, a <a href=http://forums.whatwg.org/>forum</a>, and a <a href=http://www.whatwg.org/mailing-list#help>help mailing list</a> for you!</p>
    <!--<p class="impl"><strong>Implementors!</strong> We have a <a href="http://www.whatwg.org/mailing-list#implementors">mailing list</a> for you too!</p>-->
@@ -200,17 +200,13 @@
     <ol>
      <li><a href=#serializability-of-script-execution><span class=secno>1.5.1 </span>Serializability of script execution</a></li>
      <li><a href=#compliance-with-other-specifications><span class=secno>1.5.2 </span>Compliance with other specifications</a></ol></li>
-   <li><a href=#relationships-to-other-specifications><span class=secno>1.6 </span>Relationships to other specifications</a>
+   <li><a href=#html-vs-xhtml><span class=secno>1.6 </span>HTML vs XHTML</a></li>
+   <li><a href=#structure-of-this-specification><span class=secno>1.7 </span>Structure of this specification</a>
     <ol>
-     <li><a href=#relationship-to-html4-and-dom2-html><span class=secno>1.6.1 </span>Relationship to HTML4 and DOM2 HTML</a></li>
-     <li><a href=#relationship-to-xhtml1><span class=secno>1.6.2 </span>Relationship to XHTML1</a></ol></li>
-   <li><a href=#html-vs-xhtml><span class=secno>1.7 </span>HTML vs XHTML</a></li>
-   <li><a href=#structure-of-this-specification><span class=secno>1.8 </span>Structure of this specification</a>
-    <ol>
-     <li><a href=#how-to-read-this-specification><span class=secno>1.8.1 </span>How to read this specification</a></li>
-     <li><a href=#typographic-conventions><span class=secno>1.8.2 </span>Typographic conventions</a></ol></li>
-   <li><a href=#a-quick-introduction-to-html><span class=secno>1.9 </span>A quick introduction to HTML</a></li>
-   <li><a href=#recommended-reading><span class=secno>1.10 </span>Recommended reading</a></ol></li>
+     <li><a href=#how-to-read-this-specification><span class=secno>1.7.1 </span>How to read this specification</a></li>
+     <li><a href=#typographic-conventions><span class=secno>1.7.2 </span>Typographic conventions</a></ol></li>
+   <li><a href=#a-quick-introduction-to-html><span class=secno>1.8 </span>A quick introduction to HTML</a></li>
+   <li><a href=#recommended-reading><span class=secno>1.9 </span>Recommended reading</a></ol></li>
  <li><a href=#infrastructure><span class=secno>2 </span>Common infrastructure</a>
   <ol>
    <li><a href=#terminology><span class=secno>2.1 </span>Terminology</a>
@@ -1148,39 +1144,98 @@
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
-  <p>Work on HTML5 originally started in late 2003, as a proof of
-  concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's forms to
-  provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced, without
-  requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were
-  incompatible with existing HTML Web pages. At this early stage,
-  while the draft was already publicly available, and input was
-  already being solicited from all sources, the specification was only
-  under Opera Software's copyright.</p>
+  <p>For its first first years (1990-1995), HTML went through a number
+  of revisions and experienced a number of extensions, primarily
+  hosted first at CERN, and then at the IETF.</p>
 
-  <p>In early 2004, some of the principles that underlie this effort,
-  as well as an early draft proposal covering just forms-related
-  features, were presented to the W3C jointly by Mozilla and Opera at
-  a workshop discussing the future of Web Applications on the Web. The
-  proposal was rejected on the grounds that the proposal conflicted
-  with the previously chosen direction for the Web's evolution.</p>
+  <p>With the creation of the W3C, HTML's development changed venue
+  again. A first abortive attempt at extending HTML in 1995 known as
+  HTML 3.0 then made way to a more pragmatic approach known as HTML
+  3.2, which was completed in 1997. HTML4 followed, reaching
+  completion in 1998.</p>
 
+  <p>At this time, the W3C membership decided to stop evolving HTML
+  and instead begin work on an XML-based equivalent, called
+  XHTML. This effort started with a reforumlation of HTML4 in XML,
+  known as XHTML 1.0, which added no new features except the new
+  serialization, and which was completed in 2000. After XHTML 1.0, the
+  W3C's focus turned to making it easier for other working groups to
+  extend XHTML, under the banner of XHTML Modularization. In parallel
+  with this, the W3C also worked on a new language that was no
+  compatible with the earlier HTML and XHTML languages, calling it
+  XHTML2.</p>
+
+  <p>Around the time that HTML's evolution was stopped in 1998, parts
+  of the API for HTML developed by browsers were specified and
+  published under the name DOM Level 1 (in 1998) and DOM Core Level 2
+  and DOM HTML Level 2 (starting in 2000 and culminating in
+  2003). These efforts then petered out, with some DOM Level 3
+  specifications published in 2004 but the working group being closed
+  before all the Level 3 drafts were published.</p>
+
+  <p>In 2003, the publication of XForms, a technology which was
+  positioned as the next generation of Web forms, sparked a renewed
+  interest in evolving HTML itself, rather than finding replacements
+  for it. This interest was borne from the realization that XML's
+  deployment as a Web technology was limited to entirely new
+  technologies (like RSS and later Atom), rather than as a replacement
+  for existing deployed technologies (like HTML).</p>
+
+  <p>A proof of concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's
+  forms to provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced,
+  without requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were
+  incompatible with existing HTML Web pages, was the first result of
+  this renewed interest. At this early stage, while the draft was
+  already publicly available, and input was already being solicited
+  from all sources, the specification was only under Opera Software's
+  copyright.</p>
+
+  <p>The idea that HTML's evolution should be reopened was tested at a
+  W3C workshop in 2004, where some of the principles that underlie the
+  HTML5 work (described below), as well as the aforementioned early
+  draft proposal covering just forms-related features, were presented
+  to the W3C jointly by Mozilla and Opera. The proposal was rejected
+  on the grounds that the proposal conflicted with the previously
+  chosen direction for the Web's evolution; the W3C staff and
+  membership voted to continue developing XML-based replacements
+  instead.</p>
+
   <p>Shortly thereafter, Apple, Mozilla, and Opera jointly announced
   their intent to continue working on the effort. A public mailing
   list was created, and the drafts were moved to the WHATWG site. The
   copyright was subsequently amended to be jointly owned by all three
   vendors, and to allow reuse of the specifications.</p>
 
-  <p>In 2006, the W3C expressed interest in the specification, and
-  created a working group chartered to work with the WHATWG on the
-  development of the HTML5 specifications. The working group opened in
-  2007. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish the
-  specifications under the W3C copyright, while keeping versions with
-  the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.</p>
+  <p>The WHATWG was based on several core principles, in particular
+  that technologies need to be backwards compatible, that
+  specifications and implementations need to match even if this means
+  changing the specification rather than the implementations, and that
+  specifications need to be detailed enough that implementations can
+  achieve complete interoperability without reverse-engineering each
+  other.</p>
 
+  <p>The latter requirement in particular required that the scope of
+  the HTML5 specification include what had previously been specified
+  in three separate documents: HTML4, XHTML1, and DOM2 HTML. It also
+  meant including significantly more detail than had previously been
+  included.</p>
+
+  <p>In 2006, the W3C indicated an interest to participate in the
+  development of HTML5 after all, and in 2007 formed a working group
+  chartered to work with the WHATWG on the development of the HTML5
+  specification. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish
+  the specification under the W3C copyright, while keeping a version
+  with the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.</p>
+
   <p>Since then, both groups have been working together.</p>
 
+  <p>A separate document has been published by the W3C HTML working
+  group to document the differences between this specification and the
+  language described in the HTML4 specification. <a href=#refsHTMLDIFF>[HTMLDIFF]</a></p>
 
 
+
+
   <h3 id=design-notes><span class=secno>1.5 </span>Design notes</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
@@ -1234,54 +1289,11 @@
 
 
 
-  <h3 id=relationships-to-other-specifications><span class=secno>1.6 </span>Relationships to other specifications</h3>
 
-  <h4 id=relationship-to-html4-and-dom2-html><span class=secno>1.6.1 </span>Relationship to HTML4 and DOM2 HTML</h4>
+  <h3 id=html-vs-xhtml><span class=secno>1.6 </span>HTML vs XHTML</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
-  <p>This specification describes a new revision of the HTML language
-  and its associated DOM API.</p>
-
-  <p>The requirements in this specification for features that were
-  already in HTML4 and DOM2 HTML are based primarily on the
-  implementation and deployment experience collected over the past ten
-  years. Some features have been removed from the language, based on
-  best current practices; implementation requirements for some of
-  these, as well as for non-standard features that have nonetheless
-  garnered wide use, are still included in this specification to allow
-  implementations to continue supporting legacy content.  <a href=#refsHTML4>[HTML4]</a> <a href=#refsDOM2HTML>[DOM2HTML]</a></p>
-
-  <p>A separate document has been published by the W3C HTML working
-  group to provide a more detailed reference of the differences
-  between this specification and the language described in the HTML4
-  specification. <a href=#refsHTMLDIFF>[HTMLDIFF]</a></p>
-
-
-
-  <h4 id=relationship-to-xhtml1><span class=secno>1.6.2 </span>Relationship to XHTML1</h4>
-
-  <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
-
-  <p>This specification is intended to replace XHTML1 as the normative
-  definition of the XML serialization of the HTML vocabulary. <a href=#refsXHTML1>[XHTML1]</a></p>
-
-  <p>While this specification updates the semantics and requirements
-  of the vocabulary defined by XHTML Modularization 1.1, it does not
-  attempt to provide a replacement for the modularization scheme
-  defined and used by that specification and its companion
-  specifications. <a href=#refsXHTMLMOD>[XHTMLMOD]</a></p>
-
-  <p>Thus, authors and implementors who need such a modularization
-  scheme are encouraged to continue using the XHTML Modularization
-  line of specifications.</p>
-
-
-
-  <h3 id=html-vs-xhtml><span class=secno>1.7 </span>HTML vs XHTML</h3>
-
-  <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
-
   <p>This specification defines an abstract language for describing
   documents and applications, and some APIs for interacting with
   in-memory representations of resources that use this language.</p>
@@ -1320,7 +1332,7 @@
   HTML syntax or in XML.</p>
 
 
-  <h3 id=structure-of-this-specification><span class=secno>1.8 </span>Structure of this specification</h3>
+  <h3 id=structure-of-this-specification><span class=secno>1.7 </span>Structure of this specification</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
@@ -1393,7 +1405,7 @@
   that are out of scope</a> for this specification.</p>
 
 
-  <h4 id=how-to-read-this-specification><span class=secno>1.8.1 </span>How to read this specification</h4>
+  <h4 id=how-to-read-this-specification><span class=secno>1.7.1 </span>How to read this specification</h4>
 
   <p>This specification should be read like all other specifications.
   First, it should be read cover-to-cover, multiple times. Then, it
@@ -1402,7 +1414,7 @@
   cross-references.</p>
 
 
-  <h4 id=typographic-conventions><span class=secno>1.8.2 </span>Typographic conventions</h4>
+  <h4 id=typographic-conventions><span class=secno>1.7.2 </span>Typographic conventions</h4>
 
   <p>This is a definition, requirement, or explanation.</p>
 
@@ -1444,7 +1456,7 @@
 
 
 
-  <h3 id=a-quick-introduction-to-html><span class=secno>1.9 </span>A quick introduction to HTML</h3>
+  <h3 id=a-quick-introduction-to-html><span class=secno>1.8 </span>A quick introduction to HTML</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
@@ -1589,7 +1601,7 @@
 
 
 
-  <h3 id=recommended-reading><span class=secno>1.10 </span>Recommended reading</h3>
+  <h3 id=recommended-reading><span class=secno>1.9 </span>Recommended reading</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
@@ -75344,11 +75356,6 @@
    <dd><cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/css3-ui/>CSS3 Basic User
    Interface Module</a></cite>, T. &Ccedil;elik. W3C, May 2004.</dd>
 
-   <dt id=refsDOM2HTML>[DOM2HTML]</dt>
-   <dd>(Non-normative) <cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-2-HTML/>Document Object Model
-   (DOM) Level 2 HTML Specification</a></cite>, J. Stenback, P. Le
-   Hegaret, A. Le Hors. W3C, January 2003.</dd>
-
    <dt id=refsDOMCORE>[DOMCORE]</dt>
    <dd><cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/DOM-Level-3-Core/>Document
    Object Model (DOM) Level 3 Core Specification</a></cite>, A. Le
@@ -75424,11 +75431,6 @@
    <dd>(Non-normative) <cite>Inter Gravissimas</cite>, A. Lilius,
    C. Clavius. Gregory XIII Papal Bulls, February 1582.</dd>
 
-   <dt id=refsHTML4>[HTML4]</dt>
-   <dd>(Non-normative) <cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/>HTML 4.01
-   Specification</a></cite>, D. Raggett, A. Le Hors, I. Jacobs.  W3C,
-   December 1999.</dd>
-
    <dt id=refsHTMLDIFF>[HTMLDIFF]</dt>
    <!--
    <dd>(Non-normative) <cite><a
@@ -75807,16 +75809,6 @@
    <dd><cite><a href=http://dev.w3.org/2006/webapi/XMLHttpRequest-2/><code>XMLHttpRequest</code></a></cite>,
    A. van Kesteren. W3C, June 2009.</dd>
 
-   <dt id=refsXHTML1>[XHTML1]</dt>
-   <dd><cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/>XHTML(TM) 1.0 The
-   Extensible HyperText Markup Language (Second Edition)</a></cite>. W3C,
-   August 2002.</dd>
-
-   <dt id=refsXHTMLMOD>[XHTMLMOD]</dt>
-   <dd><cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml-modularization>Modularization of
-   XHTML(TM)</a></cite>, M. Altheim, F. Boumphrey, S. Dooley, S.
-   McCarron, S. Schnitzenbaumer, T. Wugofski. W3C, April 2001.</dd>
-
    <dt id=refsXML>[XML]</dt>
    <dd><cite><a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/>Extensible Markup
    Language</a></cite>, T. Bray, J. Paoli, C. Sperberg-McQueen,

Modified: source
===================================================================
--- source	2009-09-17 22:56:55 UTC (rev 3883)
+++ source	2009-09-18 00:13:29 UTC (rev 3884)
@@ -96,39 +96,99 @@
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
 
-  <p>Work on HTML5 originally started in late 2003, as a proof of
-  concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's forms to
-  provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced, without
-  requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were
-  incompatible with existing HTML Web pages. At this early stage,
-  while the draft was already publicly available, and input was
-  already being solicited from all sources, the specification was only
-  under Opera Software's copyright.</p>
+  <p>For its first first years (1990-1995), HTML went through a number
+  of revisions and experienced a number of extensions, primarily
+  hosted first at CERN, and then at the IETF.</p>
 
-  <p>In early 2004, some of the principles that underlie this effort,
-  as well as an early draft proposal covering just forms-related
-  features, were presented to the W3C jointly by Mozilla and Opera at
-  a workshop discussing the future of Web Applications on the Web. The
-  proposal was rejected on the grounds that the proposal conflicted
-  with the previously chosen direction for the Web's evolution.</p>
+  <p>With the creation of the W3C, HTML's development changed venue
+  again. A first abortive attempt at extending HTML in 1995 known as
+  HTML 3.0 then made way to a more pragmatic approach known as HTML
+  3.2, which was completed in 1997. HTML4 followed, reaching
+  completion in 1998.</p>
 
+  <p>At this time, the W3C membership decided to stop evolving HTML
+  and instead begin work on an XML-based equivalent, called
+  XHTML. This effort started with a reforumlation of HTML4 in XML,
+  known as XHTML 1.0, which added no new features except the new
+  serialization, and which was completed in 2000. After XHTML 1.0, the
+  W3C's focus turned to making it easier for other working groups to
+  extend XHTML, under the banner of XHTML Modularization. In parallel
+  with this, the W3C also worked on a new language that was no
+  compatible with the earlier HTML and XHTML languages, calling it
+  XHTML2.</p>
+
+  <p>Around the time that HTML's evolution was stopped in 1998, parts
+  of the API for HTML developed by browsers were specified and
+  published under the name DOM Level 1 (in 1998) and DOM Core Level 2
+  and DOM HTML Level 2 (starting in 2000 and culminating in
+  2003). These efforts then petered out, with some DOM Level 3
+  specifications published in 2004 but the working group being closed
+  before all the Level 3 drafts were published.</p>
+
+  <p>In 2003, the publication of XForms, a technology which was
+  positioned as the next generation of Web forms, sparked a renewed
+  interest in evolving HTML itself, rather than finding replacements
+  for it. This interest was borne from the realization that XML's
+  deployment as a Web technology was limited to entirely new
+  technologies (like RSS and later Atom), rather than as a replacement
+  for existing deployed technologies (like HTML).</p>
+
+  <p>A proof of concept to show that it was possible to extend HTML4's
+  forms to provide many of the features that XForms 1.0 introduced,
+  without requiring browsers to implement rendering engines that were
+  incompatible with existing HTML Web pages, was the first result of
+  this renewed interest. At this early stage, while the draft was
+  already publicly available, and input was already being solicited
+  from all sources, the specification was only under Opera Software's
+  copyright.</p>
+
+  <p>The idea that HTML's evolution should be reopened was tested at a
+  W3C workshop in 2004, where some of the principles that underlie the
+  HTML5 work (described below), as well as the aforementioned early
+  draft proposal covering just forms-related features, were presented
+  to the W3C jointly by Mozilla and Opera. The proposal was rejected
+  on the grounds that the proposal conflicted with the previously
+  chosen direction for the Web's evolution; the W3C staff and
+  membership voted to continue developing XML-based replacements
+  instead.</p>
+
   <p>Shortly thereafter, Apple, Mozilla, and Opera jointly announced
   their intent to continue working on the effort. A public mailing
   list was created, and the drafts were moved to the WHATWG site. The
   copyright was subsequently amended to be jointly owned by all three
   vendors, and to allow reuse of the specifications.</p>
 
-  <p>In 2006, the W3C expressed interest in the specification, and
-  created a working group chartered to work with the WHATWG on the
-  development of the HTML5 specifications. The working group opened in
-  2007. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish the
-  specifications under the W3C copyright, while keeping versions with
-  the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.</p>
+  <p>The WHATWG was based on several core principles, in particular
+  that technologies need to be backwards compatible, that
+  specifications and implementations need to match even if this means
+  changing the specification rather than the implementations, and that
+  specifications need to be detailed enough that implementations can
+  achieve complete interoperability without reverse-engineering each
+  other.</p>
 
+  <p>The latter requirement in particular required that the scope of
+  the HTML5 specification include what had previously been specified
+  in three separate documents: HTML4, XHTML1, and DOM2 HTML. It also
+  meant including significantly more detail than had previously been
+  included.</p>
+
+  <p>In 2006, the W3C indicated an interest to participate in the
+  development of HTML5 after all, and in 2007 formed a working group
+  chartered to work with the WHATWG on the development of the HTML5
+  specification. Apple, Mozilla, and Opera allowed the W3C to publish
+  the specification under the W3C copyright, while keeping a version
+  with the less restrictive license on the WHATWG site.</p>
+
   <p>Since then, both groups have been working together.</p>
 
+  <p>A separate document has been published by the W3C HTML working
+  group to document the differences between this specification and the
+  language described in the HTML4 specification. <a
+  href="#refsHTMLDIFF">[HTMLDIFF]</a></p>
 
 
+
+
   <h3>Design notes</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
@@ -184,53 +244,7 @@
 
 
 
-  <h3>Relationships to other specifications</h3>
 
-  <h4>Relationship to HTML4 and DOM2 HTML</h4>
-
-  <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
-
-  <p>This specification describes a new revision of the HTML language
-  and its associated DOM API.</p>
-
-  <p>The requirements in this specification for features that were
-  already in HTML4 and DOM2 HTML are based primarily on the
-  implementation and deployment experience collected over the past ten
-  years. Some features have been removed from the language, based on
-  best current practices; implementation requirements for some of
-  these, as well as for non-standard features that have nonetheless
-  garnered wide use, are still included in this specification to allow
-  implementations to continue supporting legacy content.  <a
-  href="#refsHTML4">[HTML4]</a> <a
-  href="#refsDOM2HTML">[DOM2HTML]</a></p>
-
-  <p>A separate document has been published by the W3C HTML working
-  group to provide a more detailed reference of the differences
-  between this specification and the language described in the HTML4
-  specification. <a href="#refsHTMLDIFF">[HTMLDIFF]</a></p>
-
-
-
-  <h4>Relationship to XHTML1</h4>
-
-  <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>
-
-  <p>This specification is intended to replace XHTML1 as the normative
-  definition of the XML serialization of the HTML vocabulary. <a
-  href="#refsXHTML1">[XHTML1]</a></p>
-
-  <p>While this specification updates the semantics and requirements
-  of the vocabulary defined by XHTML Modularization 1.1, it does not
-  attempt to provide a replacement for the modularization scheme
-  defined and used by that specification and its companion
-  specifications. <a href="#refsXHTMLMOD">[XHTMLMOD]</a></p>
-
-  <p>Thus, authors and implementors who need such a modularization
-  scheme are encouraged to continue using the XHTML Modularization
-  line of specifications.</p>
-
-
-
   <h3>HTML vs XHTML</h3>
 
   <p><i>This section is non-normative.</i></p>



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