<div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 6:09 PM, Silvia Pfeiffer <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com">silviapfeiffer1@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div class="im">On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 2:04 AM, Eoin Kilfeather &lt;<a href="mailto:ekilfeather@dmc.dit.ie">ekilfeather@dmc.dit.ie</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt; I was wondering if any though had been given to a consistant way of<br>


&gt; dealing with stereoscopic displays. A use case has come up in a<br>
&gt; project I am working on which calls for the use of stereoscopic UIs<br>
&gt; but I can find no metion of the term in either the specs or the<br>
&gt; mailing list archive. My though was that perhaps it could be achieved<br>
&gt; by having a browsing context &quot;_left_display&quot; or &quot;_right_display&quot;<br>
&gt; allowing the user agent would render the left/right eye views to the<br>
&gt; correct display in a technology agnostic way. Apologies if this has<br>
&gt; already been covered.<br><br>
</div>I do not think such a need has been taken to the Web yet.<br>
<br>
I am wondering: Would that require a Web page to be defined as<br>
actually two basically complete Web pages, separately coded, and then<br>
marked as targeted at the left eye and the right eye? That would be a<br>
very special use case on the Web and hardly render on every Desktop<br>
other than maybe as two Web pages one behind the other.<br>
<br>
If you need something like this, why don&#39;t you implement a demo with<br>
two actually separate Web pages and a main page that somehow connects<br>
the two pages to your stereoscopic display, targeting one at each<br>
channel? JavaScript will help. Then you can find out if there is some<br>
technical limit and how it may be done in HTML if there is a need for<br>
extension.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I would think in most cases you would be using something like WebGL to render the 3D scene anyway, and WebGL already has all the information to render to a stereoscopic display.</div>

<div><br></div><div>For normal DOM elements, it might be reasonable to have a renderDepth attribute, and have the browser render the left/right versions properly to convey the depth, but that seems more like a gimmick than anything useful. ¬† Given the precision required, I don&#39;t think¬†separately¬†coding left/right web pages would be useful at all.</div>

</div><br>-- <br>John A. Tamplin<br>Software Engineer (GWT), Google<br>