<span class="gmail_quote">On 4/17/07, <b class="gmail_sendername">Thomas Broyer</b> <<a href="mailto:t.broyer@gmail.com" target="_blank" onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)">t.broyer@gmail.com</a>> wrote:
</span><br><div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<br>I hope you're talking about GZip or BZip2, not application/zipů<br><br></blockquote></div><br>Doesn't matter to me - I just figure some sort of compression would help, and it would probably help if that compression was supported by browsers, so gzip sounds right.
<br><br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">The problem is the current browser support for .mht and support for<br>generating/loading .mht files with binary attachments.
</blockquote><div><br>Which appears to be halfway there in the major browsers.  <br><br><blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;" class="gmail_quote">The method for reading Web pages off line is subscription, not downloading.
<br>Your browser should support subscription.  Enable it for your favorite pages<br>and you are done.</blockquote><div><br>Maybe in your browser, but not store on disk apart from your browser, and not to transfer to someone else (via email, web download, p2p) as a self-contained document (
e.g. a powerpoint-style presentation)<br><br>.mht looks good because it can retain original URLs of online resources, it's fairly human readable and debuggable, and it already has a standard and some support.  An HTML document can reference its external parts (images, css) via either cid: URIs or the original HTTP URL as long as all the right Content-Location headers are present.
<br><br>a single compressed file (.zip?) looks good because of the size and how easily it can be unpacked and used with a browser that doesn't natively support the single compressed file.  I don't know what URI scheme an HTML document would use to reference images and CSS.
<br><br>The only other thing I can think of is an HTML document that uses data: URIs to reference its external parts (e.g. a CSS file) which also use data URIs to reference their external parts (e.g. background images).<br>
<br>What place does HTML5 have in specifying one of these options as a standard archive format?  Any?  A non-normative section on archives?<br></div></div>