On Thu, Sep 10, 2009 at 1:33 PM, Jeremy Orlow <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jorlow@chromium.org">jorlow@chromium.org</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<div>In general this seems like a pretty interesting idea. ┬áIt definitely would be nice to completely abstract away all concepts of concurrency from web developers, but some of our solutions thus far (message passing, async interfaces, etc) have not been terribly appreciated by developers either.<br>
</div></blockquote><div><br>You have to be careful with developer feedback. Developers inexperienced with pthread-style threads-and-locks typically like the model, since it's a simple abstraction that *superficially* appears to map easily onto their existing sequential code (e.g. because they can carry on using lots of shared state). It's not until you get more experienced with it in a large system that you really feel the pain, and appreciate why an apparently more restrictive model might work better.<br>
<br>Rob</div></div>-- <br>"He was pierced for our transgressions, he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and by his wounds we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all." [Isaiah 53:5-6]<br>